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Today’s Pro Bono news cartoon. Inspired by the post The future of ethical AI.

Kunmanara is a book published by the Department for Education, Government of South Australia, for use in schools in the APY (Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara) Lands in the remote north west of South Australia. There are Pitjantjatjara and Yakunytjatjara language versions.

As Australia enters its eighth week of the COVID-19 vaccine rollout, thousands of the nation’s most vulnerable are still waiting for their first dose. Today’s Pro Bono news cartoon.

Independence Educational publishers UK produce Issues a series of high quality cross-curricular resource books for secondary school students. Six new books in the series have just been published: Active citizenship, Bullying, Business, Health & fitness, Waste & recycling and Privacy. Each book includes a number of cartoon illustrations by cartoonists Angelo Madrid and myself. Some of my illustrations are below.

Two videos by Laundry Lane Productions for STARTTS, the NSW Service for the Treatment and Rehabilitation of Torture and Trauma Survivors. STARTTS developed the scripts from which I drew storyboards and, after feedback, the illustrations. The illustration pieces for each scene were animated, along with voiceover and sound, by Santiago Dutil.

Disability advocates have slammed proposed changes to the National Disability Insurance Scheme detailed in leaked draft legislation, amid fears the government plans to deny vulnerable people support and shut out the voices of advocacy groups‘. Today’s Pro Bono news cartoon

Who would have thought ….. As federal parliament continues to erupt with allegations of harassment and abuse, one of the responses from our most senior leaders has been empathy training.

Just when we need a leader on so many issues, we are plunged into a cesspool of abuse, misogyny, self-pity and missing-the-point mush. Read what he said on Tuesday, and more of the background.

Today’s Pro Bono news cartoon. The women’s march was a huge success. Now comes the hard part: how to actually get something done.

Teaching by Numbers, an illustration for the article in the latest Australian Education Union Journal (South Australia branch). ‘An increasing number of politicians and education consultancy businesses believe that knowledge can be broken down into discrete parts, standardised for easy consumption, routinised to ensure consistency and subsequently measured through predefined forms of assessment.’