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Category Archives: indigenous issues

This week’s Pro Bono news cartoon. For a more positive and heartening development: Community-driven gathering pushes to decolonise Australia’s philanthropy.

The ruling Liberal National Party LNP ( a conservative coalition) has little understanding of just what the future is challenging us with… Cartoon ideas on a range of issues for the next Australian Socialist journal.

A video for the Remote Area Health CorpsContinuous Quality Improvement (CQI) eLearning module. The Remote Area Health Corps (RAHC) was established in 2008 and is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health under The Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme: Stronger Futures Northern Territory to “address persistent challenges to accessing primary healthcare services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait people in the Northern Territory”.

Following Rio Tinto’s destruction of Juukan Gorge in 2020, a new toolkit is here to help investors better understand and protect First Nations rights and cultural sites’. Today’s Pro Bono news cartoon 

This week’s Pro Bono news cartoon. For more, read Only through inclusion can you make the most out of workforce diversity.

Kunmanara is a book published by the Department for Education, Government of South Australia, for use in schools in the APY (Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara) Lands in the remote north west of South Australia. There are Pitjantjatjara and Yakunytjatjara language versions.

Disability advocates have slammed proposed changes to the National Disability Insurance Scheme detailed in leaked draft legislation, amid fears the government plans to deny vulnerable people support and shut out the voices of advocacy groups‘. Today’s Pro Bono news cartoon

Mining company Rio Tinto’s destruction of the Juukan Caves in the Hamersley Range, Western Australia, provoked Parry Agius of Linking Futures to develop a series of images targeting investors in mining companies. The aim is to encourage investors to consider indigenous heritage sites as libraries of knowledge, history and humanity spanning thousands of years and appeal to their moral judgement in reassessing their investment. The Juukan Caves site showed evidence of 47,000 years of human occupation. Other sites across the country show evidence of up to 60,000 years. Here are some of the images:

Black lives matter, by Kate Auty, the Last Word article in the next quarterly issue of The Alternative Law Journal. Auty refers to Chris Owen’s 2016 book on the Western Australian policing of Aboriginal people – Every Mother’s son is guilty, and in particular the cover photograph, taken around 1900, of nearly 100 Aboriginal men and boys neck chained for ‘cattle killing’. The significance of the woodpile in the background is explained. Auty underlines the links between the needs expressed in the Uluru Statement – voice, treaty and truth telling – ‘with both the colonial past and the contemporary anger and grief which sits under the campaign about why black lives matter and why protest is critically important.’

Here is my cartoon to illustrate the article and the cover of the book.