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The Sexual Violence Research and Prevention Unit (SVRPU), The University of the Sunshine Coast, hosted a one-day symposium on September 8th, the first of its kind, bringing together national and international experts to discuss the importance of context for preventing sexual violence and abuse and improving community safety. 

There is growing recognition, and a developing evidence base, supporting the contextual dynamics of sexual violence and abuse. Lessons learned from Australia’s Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, for example, drew attention to contextual factors (organisational leadership, policies and practice) that create conditions that might either increase risk, or protect against, sexual abuse. Multidisciplinary research evidence also shows how family, peer, school and neighbourhood settings may also contribute to abusive behaviour. Collectively, this highlights the need to ensure prevention strategies, as well as responses to sexual abuse, are contextualised.‘ 

Caricatures of the presenters, including a rough diagram summary of their presentation, were prepared earlier:

… and some of the cartoons drawn during the symposium:

4 Comments

  1. The message of the last drawing says so much. It is the most powerful of the series, I think.

    • Thank you John, I value your thoughts. I’m glad to know that simple cartoon did work, and say something important that was talked about in the symposium. Best wishes!

      • You are very welcome. I taught in an inner-city elementary school for 20 years, and whenever a student seemed troubled, most of the time it was an adult that had caused it. Keep up the good work! Your drawings give a face to those who often stay hidden by shame.

      • A good observation.
        And thank you!


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